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“Washington CoastSavers is an alliance of partners and volunteers dedicated to keeping the state’s beaches clean of marine debris through coordinated beach cleanups, education and prevention.”

Online Registration for ICC Now Open

The International Coastal Cleanup will be held on September 17th this year. This is the last Saturday of Summer 2016. What better way to see Summer out than to clean a beach! Get your friends and family together and register here. If you need any further excuse to go to the beach, check out these offers for our volunteers:

FREE camping in Olympic National Park’s coastal campgrounds for the nights of September 16th and 17th.

Hamburger BBQ at Hobuck Campground (Surfrider Foundation): 11 a.m. – 2 p.m.

Lost Resort at Ozette: free famous bean soup

Kalaloch Lodge: 15% off at restaurant or gift shop

Hamburger BBQ at Twin Harbors State Park/Schafer Beach Approach (Surfrider Foundation) noon –  1 p.m.

Salmon Feed / Poetry Read

Everyone is invited to join the beach cleanups and celebrations on Saturday, September 17. During the 2015 International Coastal Cleanup, nearly 800,000 volunteers worldwide collected more than 18 million pounds of trash. On the northern coast of Washington, the Salmon Feed/Poetry Read is an free event to thank the voluntourists who come to clean Olympic Peninsula beaches. It is held in Forks, right along Highway 101 and is on the travel route for most folks.MargaretTalkToGroup copy

The Salmon Feed/Poetry Read will start around 4 p.m. at Tillicum Park with salmon serving. The event is a potluck to thank the voluntourists for cleaning our beaches. This event is offered by the Lions, Surfrider, Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary, North Pacific Marine Resources Committee, and other partners.  MikeWebbRead copyAs people travel from far and near to our beaches to clean them, and then gather for a meal and stories with one another, work is accomplished and friendships are made. The more friends work together, share ideas, best practices and contacts, enjoy food and fellowship, the more will get done. For more information about this event or to volunteer your help, contact Roy at able(at)olypen.com

Thank You Volunteers: Washington Coast Cleanup

The 2016 Washington Coast Cleanup was on April 23rd. Over 1,400 volunteers removed at least 20 tons of marine debris from more than 50 beaches! That’s over 40,000 pounds in one day. Washington CoastSavers relies on the hundreds of volunteers to keep the state’s beaches clean. Many individuals and agency staff work at the registration stations throughout the morning to ensure everything runs smoothly. Other partners provide BBQ’s for our volunteers after they come off the beach. It’s always an awesome feeling when we work together for the health and beauty of our coast.

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2015 Results

2015 was a great year for the beaches of the Washington coast. We rely on the support of hundreds of volunteers to help keep our state’s beaches free of marine debris. Here are the totals from 2015’s cleanups:

Washington Coast Cleanup: 1,500 volunteers removed over 19 tons.

July 5th Cleanup: approximately 300 volunteers removed over 120 tons!

International Coastal Cleanup: at least 300 volunteers removed 6 tons.

Total Volunteers in 2015: 2,100

Total Weight of Debris Collected: 145 tons!

 

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WHAT IS MARINE DEBRIS & WHAT CAN I DO ABOUT IT?

Learn about marine debris.
Marine debris is trash that somehow ends up in the ocean. Recognize this plastic water bottle? It could be the one you threw away several months ago – not at the beach, but at your home! It just blew out of your garbage, landed in a nearby waterway, and floated out to the coast. Now it’s degrading and poisoning our coastal wildlife and releasing its toxins into the food chain.

Or maybe a commercial fishing boat lost some gear in one of our notorious winter storms. Now it’s floating around out there, damaging our coastal fisheries, and pointlessly killing everything that gets caught.

No matter where you live or what kind of work you do, marine debris is your problem. Learn more and use our resources today.